Vets in North Raleigh Cover Dangerous Household Items For Your Pets

Our vets in North Raleigh have come together today to share with you a very important list – a list of household items that are dangerous to your cats and dogs if they are ingested. Although we have incorporated a wide range of items into this list, keep in mind that it is by no means a comprehensive list and if you have any questions about an item not included on this list, please contact your Raleigh vet, emergency vet, or the Pet Poison Hotline at (855) 764-7661.

Vets in North Raleigh Cover Dangerous Household Items For Your Pets

Human foods you shouldn't feed your pets

Foods/Drinks

Alcohol
Apple seeds
Apricot pits
Artificial sweeteners
Avocados
Blue cheese
Broccoli (in large quantities)
Cat food for dogs and dog food for cats
Cherry pits
Chocolate
Cocoa powder
Coffee
Dairy
Garlic
Grapes
Gum
Hops
Liver (in large quantities)
Macadamia nuts
Moldy food
Mushrooms
Mustard seeds
Nutmeg
Onions and onion powder
Peach pits
Potato leaves and stems (green parts)
Raisins
Raw eggs
Raw seafood
Rhubarb leaves
Salt
Spicy foods
Sugary foods
Tea
Tomato leaves and stems (green parts)
Walnuts
Xylitol
Yeast dough

Plants that are dangerous for pets

Plants

Amaryllis (Amaryllis spp.)
Autumn crocus (Colochicum autumnale)
Azalea
Bleeding heart (Dicentra spectabilis)
Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis)
Castor bean or castor oil plant (Ricinus communis)
Chinaberry tree
Chrysanthemum (Compositae spp.)
Cyclamen (Cylamen spp.)
Dumbcane (Dieffenbachia)
English Ivy, both leaves and berries (Hedera helix)
Flower bulbs of any kind
Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea)
Hemlock (Conium maculatum)
Horse Chestnut
Jerusalem cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum)
Laburnum
Larkspur (Delphinium)
Lily of the valley (Convallaria majalis)
Marijuana (Cannabis sativa)
Mistletoe (Viscum album)
Oleander (Nerium oleander)
Peace Lily or Mauna Loa Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum spp.)
Pothos (both Scindapsus and Epipremnum)
Privet
Rhododendron
Rhubarb (Rheum rhaponticum)
Sago Palm
Schefflera (Schefflera and Brassaia actinophylla)
Stinging nettles (Urtica dioica)
Thorn apple or jimsonweed (Datura stramonium)
Tulip/Narcissus bulbs (Tulipa/Narcissus spp.)
Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia)
Wisteria
Yew (Taxus spp.)

Household products that are dangerous to your pets

Home Products

Antifreeze
Batteries
Cleaning products
De-icers
Detergents
Fabric softner sheets
Fertilizer
Human medications
Insecticides
Rodenticides
Veterinary medications (when not given as directed)

Know the Signs of Intoxication or Poisoning

There are many items in and around your home that can be toxic to your pets and not all of them are listed above. If you have questions about whether or not an item could be toxic to your pet before purchasing – as with plants, for example, it’s always best to talk to your vet or the pet poison hotline first.

Even if you are vigilent about what you have in your home, it’s still possible that your pet could get into something they shouldn’t. In this instance it’s important to know the physical signs of intoxication or poisoning so that you can act quickly. Below we have listed some of the symptoms to look out for:

  • Vomiting
  • Wretching
  • Diarrhea
  • Drooling or excessively salivating
  • Lack of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting blood
  • Coughing up blood
  • Bloody diarrhea or stools
  • Pale gums
  • Racing or slowed heartrate
  • Lethargy
  • Weakness
  • Collapse
  • Seizures
  • Unusual smelling breath
  • Excessive thirst
  • Excessive urination
  • Decreased or non-existant urination
  • Black tarry stools
  • Unusual behavior

These symptoms are quite general as it can be difficult to give specific symptoms without knowing exactly what your pet has ingested. These symptoms are also not necessarily related to poisoning and they may be a sign of other illness. Whatever the reason for your pet exhibiting these symptoms, however, it’s crucial that you get them to the vet right away for an evaluation and treatment.

Looking For Vets in North Raleigh?

If your pet is prone to getting into things they shouldn’t, make sure that you have reputable vets in North Raleigh who can not only treat them in the event of an emergency but who can also make recommendations and referrals that will help you to work with your pet on behavioral changes. Here at Leesville Animal Hospital, we have three such vets on staff who can help you and your pet to work towards a much less complicated life! To make an appointment with one of our vets just give us a call today at (919)870-7000.

Our Hours

Monday: 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Tuesday: 7:30 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wednesday: 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Thursday: 7:30 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Friday: 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Saturday: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Sunday: Boarding pick up 5 – 6 p.m.

Call Us: (919) 870-7000
Visit Us: 9309 Leesville Rd,
                 Raleigh, N.C. 27613

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